Microsoft Project Spartan

As Microsoft gears up for the first release of Project Spartan, the company has detailed Adobe's contribution to its next-gen browser.
Adobe is a major contributor to the open source WebKit (Safari), Blink (Chrome, Opera), and Gecko (Firefox) browser engines, but like everyone else, it's been locked out of Internet Explorer.
"As a result, Adobe improved the web platform in other browsers, but couldn't bring the same improvements to Microsoft's platform. This changed a few months ago when Microsoft made it possible for the Adobe Web Platform Team to contribute to Project Spartan," explained Bogdan Brinza, program manager with Project Spartan.
Adobe has contributed to Project Spartan, specifically in layout, typography, graphic design, and motion, Microsoft said. Project Spartan is expected to ship in the next update to the Windows 10 Technical Preview.
Adobe's first major contribution in the March Windows 10 Technical Preview update was support for CSS gradient midpoints or "colour hints".Several new features in the Internet Explorer rendering engine released as part of the first Windows 10 Technical Preview come courtesy of the Adobe and Microsoft partnership.
"With this feature, a web developer can specify an optional location between the colour stops of a CSS gradient. The colour will always be exactly between the colour of the two stops at that point. Other colours along the gradient line are calculated using an exponential interpolation function as described by the CSS spec," Bogdan Brinza, program manager with Project Spartan, said.
Developers can test out the new rendering engine by installing the technical preview and enabling Experimental Web Platform Features in the 'about' section, under 'flags'.
The new rendering engine's full support for blend modes, bringing IE up to par with other major browsers, is also thanks to Adobe.
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