Thursday, January 18, 2018

Interactive City Search Maps, Tools & Guides

Interactive City Search Maps, Tools & Guides

Chances are, even if you’re a lifelong resident of a particular city, you don’t know every nook and cranny, every food truck location, or the lore of every interesting local building. Apps for smartphones, tablets and other gadgets are making big urban centers feel smaller than ever, making it easy to catch a ride, find cheap eats, check out street art and make new friends.
Find out where your next meal is located with City Guide, an interactive city search that shows real-time restaurant location. The guide not only displays the restaurants on a map, with their hours at that location, but also allows you to sort results by meal, and browse menus. Search restaurants; United States, Europe, Asia, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, Toronto, with over 110 cities around the world.
Want access to maps while traveling abroad, City Guides and Brochures maps for the cities of your choice for use, including millions of POI (restaurants, bars, hotels etc.), over 1500 preset entries for sites and attractions, and travel guides. It’s available for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad with Kindle and Kobo.
Among the most popular apps to show you who’s nearby and looking to meet new people, with Facebook search gives both social butterflies and the shy an easy way to connect. You’ll probably find more people looking to date than to make new friends, and it might be easier to just walk up to someone and introduce yourself than spend your time scrolling through photos, but hey – whatever works.
This ebook lets users pinpoint, share and discover restaurants, hotels, bed breakfast, transportation and with over 1500 preset searches in their own communities as it happens and is never out of date. City Search Brochures and Guides available for cities worldwide. Buy now.
Author R.G. Richardson books and ebooks are available on Amazon, Kobo and Chapters/Indigo.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Mumbai City Search - Interactive City Guide

Mumbai City Search - Interactive City Guide
Author: R.G.Richardson
All new edition with Facebook, Duckduckgo, and Baidu Search.
No typing, just pick and click with over 1500 preset searches and never out of date! Use as white or yellow pages!
City Guides let you use the internet's full power by eliminating errors with keywords. Google, Bing, Duckduckgo, Facebook, Baidu, SlideShare, YouTube or Pinterest; click on the button and you are there; just pick and click the button, no typing. Fully mobile – it works on any device with an eBook reader and that has access to the Internet WiFi anywhere. Don't think about typing, you are good to go with better results and fewer typos. Sit back in the coffee shop and search away on their WiFi! Our guides are organized into several targeted information Guides including hotels, restaurants, pubs, historical sites, transportation, attractions, real estate and events. Stay up to date with what is happening in your city!
Our interactive ebooks search the web and are organized into several targeted information Guides including:
Buy City Guide Now

Saturday, December 30, 2017

Hangzhou City Guide - Interactive City Guide

Hangzhou City Guide - Interactive City Guide
Author: R.G.Richardson
All new edition with Facebook, Duckduckgo and Baidu Search.
No typing, just pick and click with over 1500 preset searches and never out of date! Use as white or yellow pages!
City Guides let you use the internet's full power by eliminating errors with keywords. Google, Bing, Duckduckgo, Facebook, Baidu, SlideShare, YouTube or Pinterest; click on the button and your are there; just pick and click the button, no typing. Fully mobile – it works on any device with an eBook reader and that has access to the Internet WiFi anywhere. Don't think about typing, you are good to go with better results and fewer typos. Sit back in the coffee shop and search away on their WiFi! Our guides are organized into several targeted information Guides including: hotels, restaurants, pubs, historical sites, transportation, attractions, real estate and events. Stay up to date with what is happening in your city!
Our interactive ebooks search the web and are organized into several targeted information Guides including:
Buy City Guide Now

Saturday, December 23, 2017

Erosion of Fair Sailing at the Club Level

 

Erosion of Fair Sailing at the Club Level

Published on December 2017
RacingRulesOfSailing.org is an online platform that assists in the understanding of the racing rules and provides answers to rules questions. In this report by Angelo Guarino, he discusses the impact of how unhealthy mindsets are impacting the sport.

The very first things the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) establishes are the Basic Principles and the very first Principle is ‘Sportsmanship and the Rules’ which says:
“Competitors in the sport of sailing are governed by a body of rules that they are expected to follow and enforce. A fundamental principle of sportsmanship is that when competitors break a rule they will promptly take a penalty, which may be to retire.”
FOLLOWING the rules and ENFORCING the rules are the first things the RRS call upon us to do, and are of EQUAL importance. The second demand put upon us is to police ourselves, and take our penalty when we know we have committed a foul, regardless if we are protested or not.
Follow the rules. Enforce the rules on yourself and others. Do your turns if you commit a foul without being prompted or protested. Pretty simple stuff.
But, over many years in the sport, I’ve consistently observed some sailing-community “cultural mindsets” which suppress the even application of the RRS across the fleet and erode the adoption of this Basic Principal, and thus fair-sailing in club-level racing.
Some of these can be categorized as attitudes, others are peer-pressure and misunderstandings, but taken together they combine to suppress the improved-understanding and fair-application of the rules by inhibiting racers from embracing their responsibility to enforce the rules, not only to their benefit but more importantly for the benefit of all competitors in the race.
At the heart of these erroneous mindsets, is a me-centric point-of-view in deciding how to handle on-the-water fouls. These racers ask themselves…
“Can I ignore my foul because my competitor let me go by saying, ‘You owe me one!’?”
“Did the foul effect MY score or standing?”
“I am not in contention for silver, so why ruin a top boat’s chances?”
“Will I get a reputation if I keep protesting boats that foul me?”
I short-cut the above as…
• I owe you one.
• Was my score effected?
• I’m Not Worthy.
• Stigma.

I OWE YOU ONE
I put this one first because it’s so emblematic of the me-centric thinking at the heart of the problem. The bottom line is that it is NOT at the discretion of a fouled-boat to let another boat off the hook. The rules are very clear. If a racer knows they have committed a foul, they must take a penalty whether they are protested or not. Period. A boat saying ‘I owe you one’ is acknowledging that they committed a foul and their intention to not take a penalty.
On the surface, this might seem “friendly”, but the absence of the fouled-boat’s protest, and the fouling-boat’s turns, cannot be described as anything less than collusion between boats to break the rules … basically forming a rule-breaking compact to benefit each other to the detriment of all other fleet competitors. When put in these terms, it becomes obvious how corrosive to fair competition for all “I owe you one” is.

WAS MY/YOUR SCORE EFFECTED?

I put the “my/your” in the title because this question is just as often asked by others as it is to ourselves. We’ve all had the experience of being asked after protesting, “well, did the foul really hurt you?”. The notion underlying this question is the idea that one needs to justify enforcing the rules based upon a calculation of whether or not the infraction was significant enough to affect the fouled-boat’s score. That somehow it is incumbent upon us to do a complicated analysis projecting the race forward and predict if infraction had a significant effect.
Again, it’s me-centric thinking which totally misses the point. The question is not, “Was the fouled boat harmed?”, but rather it is, “Was the fouling boat advantaged?” The fouling-boat is advantaged against all other racers in the fleet by not taking their proper penalty. Fair sailing requires all of us to enforce the rules upon ourselves and upon others regardless of the perceived gravity or impact of the foul upon the boat(s) directly involved.
I’M NOT WORTHY
I put this one between ‘Was my score effected’ and ‘Stigma’ because I feel it incorporates a little bit of both. There is pressure on boats who are at the bottom of the fleet’s standing to not ‘ruin-it’ for the top boats. This stratifies the fleet into sub-classes where the top boats can unfairly gain advantage when interacting with ‘lower boats’.
Some may think, ‘why protest as I know I won’t be in the mix anyway’. Others may associate top sailing performance with top understanding of the rules which results in an improper deference to the top boats during incidents.
But these concepts aren’t completely self-inflicted as I think there can be social pressure on boats that are consistently in the bottom half of the fleet to understand their place and that there are really two races going on … the race between the top boats and the race between everyone else.
STIGMA
Let’s face it, if you are a racer who accepts the RRS’s ‘Basic Principal – Sportsmanship and the Rules’ and accepts what it says, that it is each of our responsibility to enforce the rules to ensure fair sailing for all, you are going to feel peer-pressure to not be.
I’ve heard it coming from respected sailors suggesting that, ‘… you don’t want to get a reputation’… or ‘…you don’t want to be that-guy’. These are typically from those same top performers that are first to think it’s their prerogative to yell, ‘I owe you one’, or be the ones to ask ‘was your score effected?’ and fouling lower-performing boats figuring that they are protected from ‘I’m not worthy’ thinking.
Sometimes the Organizing Authority or Race Committee (OA/RC) can inadvertently support this environment with short-hand statements like, “Let’s keep the protests down,” at a pre-race briefing or, “We had very few protests .. ” at an awards ceremony, which could be misconstrued that protests should be avoided. Instead, they should be more deliberate and spell it out to support the Basic Principal with something like…
“Let’s have clean racing out there people. Follow the rules and if you know you fouled someone, just do your turns like you are supposed to. Let’s reserve the protest hearings for only those incidents where the foul or fault is in question”.
Or after the race, praising the number of turns they saw people do on the race course ….”We saw great sportsmanship out there, we saw boats doing their turns for clear fouls without any fanfare.”
Both of these would continue to remind and reinforce racers of their obligations and help support the correct mindset.
Concluding Remarks
I don’t have a silver-bullet to address this, but I think a first step is to shine light on it and start the conversation. There needs to be more emphasis on what the RRS’s Basic Principal says, means and how important it is in club-level racing. Somehow, we need to turn the page on the ME-centric thinking and the stigma and turn both 180 degrees on their heads. So that …
Instead of the one-on-one thinking that ‘I owe you one’ represents, we think about our responsibility to the entire fleet and how unfair it is to all competitors in a race for one boat to let another boat break a rule without penalty.
Instead of asking ourselves if the foul was significant enough to change MY score, realize that no one can project what advantage the fouling-boat might have gained, as even the smallest change in course might make the difference in that boat’s next crossing with another competitor.
It’s an impossible task to project all those outcomes, so let us just stop. The realization must be that a fouling boat has gained an incalculatable advantage against all other competitors in the fleet and that boat must take a penalty.
That lower performing boats need to evenly enforce the rules, not to improve their own score, but to ensure a fair race for all racers from the bottom of the fleet to the top.
And finally, that the stigma and reputational fear of protesting too much disappears and instead that reputational fear and stigma is turned toward its proper target… on those competitors that try to get away with fouling, on those who shirk their responsibility (for whatever reason) to enforce the rules for the benefit of all, and onto those who socially intimidate others from doing the right thing.

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Madrid City Guide - Interactive City Guide

Madrid City Guide - Interactive City Guide
Author: R.G.Richardson
All new edition with Facebook, Duckduckgo and Baidu Search.
No typing, just pick and click with over 1500 preset searches and never out of date! Use as white or yellow pages!
City Guides let you use the internet's full power by eliminating errors with keywords. Google, Bing, Duckduckgo, Facebook, Baidu, SlideShare, YouTube or Pinterest; click on the button and your are there; just pick and click the button, no typing. Fully mobile – it works on any device with an eBook reader and that has access to the Internet WiFi anywhere. Don't think about typing, you are good to go with better results and fewer typos. Sit back in the coffee shop and search away on their WiFi! Our guides are organized into several targeted information Guides including hotels, restaurants, pubs, historical sites, transportation, attractions, real estate and events. Stay up to date with what is happening in your city!
Our interactive ebooks search the web and are organized into several targeted information Guides including:
Buy City Guide Now

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

How FCC Plans to Reverse Title II Action in December

How FCC Plans to Reverse Title II Action in December

NetNeutrality2
Despite dire warnings from some corners of the media, the FCC’s planned action isn’t the end of net neutrality, and in fact it may foster growth on the internet.
Before we get started, let’s all take a deep breath. That’s it. Breathe all the way in then hold it for a few seconds, then exhale slowly. There. Feel better?
Good. Now that your heart rate has returned to normal, let’s set the record straight. The FCC’s plans regarding net neutrality, set to be revealed in detail on Nov. 22, aren’t going to end net neutrality. What the FCC is planning to do is reverse the decision that placed the internet under Title II of the Communications Act.
Obama Changed Internet Governance in 2014

A little background is required, since the Title II change happened three years ago. In 2014, then-President Barack Obama directed the FCC to change course and put internet governance under Title II. This is the same part of the Communications Act that regulates landline voice telephone service. Title II was conceived in the day when AT&T was the only carrier of significance in the United States. In order to keep pricing and practices under control was to make rules controlling how AT&T, a monopoly at the time, interacted with people.

Tom Wheeler, who was FCC Chairman at the time, did what the President wanted and drafted rules placing the internet under that regulatory framework. Prior to this, the FCC had been working with Congress to draft legislation that would have created a comprehensive, and fair, set of net neutrality rules. That bipartisan legislation was already working its way through committee hearings and had been expected to be adopted into law.
The legislation was important because a series of court decisions had found that the FCC had exceeded its authority in mandating net neutrality in the absence of enabling legislation. The shift to Title II derailed that legislation but didn’t end the court challenges.
The change to Title II redefined the internet so that it would fit the requirements of Title II, but only through a byzantine web of forbearances and assumptions did it actually enable net neutrality. Moreover, all of the various theoretical actions that net neutrality advocates feared were still possible under Title II, as long as they were disclosed in advance.
Net Neutrality Won't Be Impacted
What’s going to happen if the order is adopted is that the net neutrality picture will go back to where it was three years ago. Net neutrality existed in those days as well. The difference is that there weren’t a bunch of regulations controlling it.
What’s going to happen on Nov. 22 is this: The FCC Chairman will release a proposed order to revert internet governance to the status that was in place prior to the 2014 reclassification. However, there’s an important exception: The FCC will keep the transparency rule, which requires providers to say exactly what they promise to do as well as what they promise not to do. Then it holds them to those promises through a variety of enforcement methods.
When the proposed order is released, everyone--from the other commissioners to the internet industry to the general public--will have a chance to see the order before it’s enacted. This will allow the other commissioners a chance to negotiate changes, and it will allow public input. While the official comment period will have already passed at this point, the commission will still be aware if there are major sticking points.
This is all in marked contrast to the previous FCC that worked in secret and made decisions which were revealed only weeks or months later. Then, it was common for commissioners of the majority party to agree in secret prior to FCC meetings, never even disclosing proposed items to minority commissioners. At least now, whether you agree or not, you’ll know what’s being considered.
It's a Matter of Which Agency Will Oversee Business on the Net
Assuming the order that is approved by the commissioners is reasonably close to what FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is saying in his statement released on Nov. 21, the biggest changes that will come with the end of internet governance under Title II will be the agency that enforces how companies do business on the internet.
What will happen then is that enforcement will revert to the Federal Trade Commission, which already has responsibility to enforcing such practices elsewhere. Perhaps more importantly, the FTC has broad enforcement capabilities, and it’s a function the agency handles daily. When former Chairman Wheeler oversaw the change to Title II, he removed the role of the FTC in this enforcement. The proposed changes would put it back.
On a more practical basis, the Title II action by the FCC was headed for some serious legal challenges, Some parts of it had already been challenged in court, and it was appearing likely that the FCC would lose. The reclassification of the internet under Title II was on dubious legal grounds from the day it happened-- more accurately, from the day anyone found out about it many weeks later.
Meanwhile, it’s worth noting that even if nothing changes, which might be the case, at least the FCC isn’t being run in secret anymore.

Interactive City Search Maps, Tools & Guides

Interactive City Search Maps, Tools & Guides Chances are, even if you’re a lifelong resident of a particular city, you don’t know ever...